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Category: Lectures
Album Title: The Inaugural Fred Iklé Lecture
Date: February 19, 2016
Location: Center for Strategic and International Studies 1616 Rhode Island Avenue, NW, Washington D.C. 20036 Second Floor Conference Center
Description:

On February 19, 2016, HRNK held its first Fred Iklé lecture at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, featuring Justice Michael Kirby with introductory remarks by HRNK Co-chair Emeritus Roberta Cohen and a special guest appearance by Mimi Iklé, daughter of Fred Iklé. 

Dr. Fred Charles Iklé (August 21, 1924 – November 10, 2011) was a Swiss-born sociologist and
defense expert who became a significant part of the US defense policy establishment. While Dr.
Iklé is remembered as the scholar, policy maker, and visionary who contributed to keeping America
safe and designing the grand strategy that won the Cold War, HRNK remembers him as one of its
founding Board members. Fifteen years after its establishment, HRNK continues to be a strong organization
with a record of original research and well-received publications on North Korean human
rights in no small part because of Dr. Iklé’s ideas, passion, and reputation.


Dr. Iklé’s expertise was in defense and foreign policy, nuclear strategy, and the role of technology
in the emerging international order. After a career in academia (including a professorship at MIT)
he was appointed director of the U.S. Arms Control and Disarmament Agency in 1973-1977,
before becoming Under Secretary of Defense for Policy (1981 to 1988). He was later a member of
the Council on Foreign Relations and the Department of Defense’s Defense Policy Board Advisory
Committee, a Distinguished Scholar with the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS),
and Director of the National Endowment for Democracy.


Dr. Iklé remained at the Defense Department until 1988, when he joined the Center for Strategic
and International Studies (CSIS). Dr. Iklé served as a Commissioner on the National Commission
on Terrorism, contributing to a major report in June 2000, and for nine years as Director of
the National Endowment for Democracy. He co-chaired the bipartisan Commission on Integrated
Long-Term Strategy, which published Discriminate Deterrence in January 1988. In 1975 and 1987,
Iklé received the highest civilian award of the Department of Defense, the Medal for Distinguished
Public Service. In 1988, he was awarded the Bronze Palm. Iklé served as chairman of the Board of
the Telos Corporation and as a director of the Zurich-American Insurance Companies. He was a
Director of CMC Energy Services and served as Governor of the Smith Richardson Foundation.
He was the author of several books and numerous articles on defense, foreign policy, and arms control,
including How Nations Negotiate and Every War Must End.

 

 

George Hutchinson's The Suryong, the Soldier, and Information in the KPA is the second of three building blocks of a multi-year HRNK project to examine North Korea's information environment. Hutchinson's thoroughly researched and sourced report addresses the circulation of information within the Korean People's Army (KPA). Understanding how KPA soldiers receive their information is needed to prepare information campaigns while taking into account all possible contingenc

North Korea’s Political Prison Camp, Kwan-li-so No. 14, Update 1
Joseph S. Bermudez, Jr., Greg Scarlatoiu, and Amanda Mortwedt Oh
Dec 22, 2021

This report is part of a comprehensive long-term project undertaken by HRNK to use satellite imagery and former prisoner interviews to shed light on human suffering in North Korea by monitoring activity at political prison facilities throughout the nation. This is the second HRNK satellite imagery report detailing activity observed during 2015 to 2021 at a prison facility commonly identified by former prisoners and researchers as “Kwan-li-so No. 14 Kaech’ŏn” (39.646810, 126.117058) and

North Korea's Long-term Prison-Labor Facility, Kyo-hwa-so No.3, T’osŏng-ni (토성리)
Joseph S Bermudez Jr, Greg Scarlatoiu, Amanda Oh, & Rosa Tokola
Nov 03, 2021

This report is part of a comprehensive long-term project undertaken by HRNK to use satellite imagery and former prisoner interviews to shed light on human suffering in North Korea by monitoring activity at civil and political prison facilities throughout the nation. This study details activity observed during 1968–1977 and 2002–2021 at a prison facility commonly identified by former prisoners and researchers as "Kyo-hwa-so No. 3, T'osŏng-ni" and endeavors to e

North Korea’s Political Prison Camp, Kwan-li-so No. 25, Update 3
Joseph S Bermudez Jr, Greg Scarlatoiu, Amanda Oh, & Rosa Tokola
Sep 30, 2021

This report is part of a comprehensive long-term project undertaken by HRNK to use satellite imagery and former detainee interviews to shed light on human suffering in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK, more commonly known as North Korea) by monitoring activity at political prison facilities throughout the nation. This report provides an abbreviated update to our previous reports on a long-term political prison commonly identified by former prisoners and researchers as Kwan-li-so

North Korea’s Potential Long-Term  Prison-Labor Facility at Sŏnhwa-dong (선화동)
Joseph S. Bermudez, Jr., Greg Scarlatoiu, Amanda Oh, & Rosa Park
Aug 26, 2021

Through satellite imagery analysis and witness testimony, HRNK has identified a previously unknown potential kyo-hwa-so long-term prison-labor facility at Sŏnhwa-dong (선화동) P’ihyŏn-gun, P’yŏngan-bukto, North Korea. While this facility appears to be operational and well maintained, further imagery analysis and witness testimony collection will be necessary in order to irrefutably confirm that Sŏnhwa-dong is a kyo-hwa-so.

North Korea’s Long-term Prison-Labor Facility Kyo-hwa-so No. 8, Sŭngho-ri (승호리) - Update
Joseph S Bermudez, Jr, Greg Scarlatoiu, Amanda M Oh, & Rosa Park
Jul 22, 2021

"North Korea’s Long-term Prison-Labor Facility Kyo-hwa-so No. 8, Sŭngho-ri (승호리) - Update" is the latest report under a long-term project employing satellite imagery analysis and former political prisoner testimony to shed light on human suffering in North Korea's prison camps.

Human Rights in the Democratic Republic of Korea: The Role of the United Nations" is HRNK's 50th report in our 20-year history. This is even more meaningful as David Hawk's "Hidden Gulag" (2003) was the first report published by HRNK. In his latest report, Hawk details efforts by many UN member states and by the UN’s committees, projects and procedures to promote and protect human rights in the DPRK.  The report highlights North Korea’s shifts in its approach

South Africa’s Apartheid and North Korea’s Songbun: Parallels in Crimes against Humanity by Robert Collins underlines similarities between two systematically, deliberately, and thoroughly discriminatory repressive systems. This project began with expert testimony Collins submitted as part of a joint investigation and documentation project scrutinizing human rights violations committed at North Korea’s short-term detention facilities, conducted by the Committee for Human Rights