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Imagery Analysis of Camp 15 “Yodŏk” Closure of the “Revolutionizing Zone”

Imagery Analysis of Camp 15 “Yodŏk” Closure of the “Revolutionizing Zone”

Joseph S. Bermudez Jr., Andy Dinville, and Mike Eley
Sep 18, 2015

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Embargoed until 9:00a.m. EST Friday, September 18

HRNK and AllSource Analysis have worked together to give you an updated satellite imagery analysis of one of the political prison camps in North Korea, Camp 15. Together, HRNK and ASA have discovered the closure of the "Revolutionizing Zone." 

Unusual Activity at the Kanggon Military Training Area in North Korea: Evidence of Execution by Anti-aircraft Machine Guns?

Unusual Activity at the Kanggon Military Training Area in North Korea: Evidence of Execution by Anti-aircraft Machine Guns?

Greg Scarlatoiu and Joseph Bermudez, Jr.
Apr 29, 2015

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While examining satellite imagery of an area near the North Korean capital city, the Committee for Human Rights in North Korea (HRNK) and AllSource Analysis, Inc. (ASA) may have come across evidence of a ghastly sight: the public execution of several individuals by anti-aircraft machine gun fire.

Please click here to read more. 

Arsenal of Terror: North Korea, State Sponsor of Terrorism

Arsenal of Terror: North Korea, State Sponsor of Terrorism

Joshua Stanton
Apr 27, 2015

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On April 27, 2015, HRNK released their report, Arsenal of Terror: North Korea, State Sponsor of Terrorism by Joshua Stanton at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C. Please click here to view the press release. 

North Korea: Imagery Analysis of Camp 15

North Korea: Imagery Analysis of Camp 15

Joseph S. Bermudez Jr., Andy Dinville, and Mike Eley
Feb 17, 2015

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As part of a joint undertaking with the Committee for Human Rights in North Korea (HRNK) to use satellite imagery
to shed light on human suffering in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK, more commonly known as North Korea, AllSource Analysis has been mon- itoring activity at political prison facilities throughout North Korea. This report details activity at the facility commonly known as Camp 15.

North Korea's Camp No. 25 Update

North Korea's Camp No. 25 Update

Joseph S. Bermudez Jr.
Jun 05, 2014

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As part of a joint undertaking with the Committee for Human Rights in North Korea (HRNK) to use satellite imagery to shed light on human suffering in North Korea AllSource Analysis (ASA) has been monitoring activity at political prison facilities in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK, more commonly known as North Korea). 

This report covers activity observed during the past 12 months at the facility commonly known as Kwan-li-so No. 25 (Political Prison Camp No. 25) and updates HRNK’s February 2013 report on the same subject.

For this report, ASA undertook an imagery analysis of Camp No. 25 and its environs using a 50 cm pansharpened multispectral satellite image collected by Airbus Defense and Space (Airbus) on March 22, 2014.

Illicit: North Korea's Evolving Operations to Earn Hard Currency

Illicit: North Korea's Evolving Operations to Earn Hard Currency

Sheena Chestnut Greitens
Apr 15, 2014

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In Illicit: North Korea’s Evolving Operations to Earn Hard Curre­­ncy, Sheena Chestnut Greitens provides a detailed and thoroughly researched account of the role of illicit activities in the North Korean economy. A central conclusion of Chestnut Greitens’ analysis is that in the context of eroding state control over the licit aspects of the economy, illicit activities are also being “privatized” by North Korea’s elite.  As HRNK Co-chair and former USAID Administrator Andrew Natsios puts it, Chestnut Greitens’ report provides “evidence that a market economy is developing in North Korea, in this case a criminal one that is feeding off the suffering and deprivation of the population. The report is about the absence of the rule of law on a grand scale in North Korea and in a way that criminal activity is now being privatized.  It is very useful in understanding the perverse transformation of the country going on right now.”

North Korea's Hidden Gulag: Interpreting Reports of Changes in the Prison Camps

North Korea's Hidden Gulag: Interpreting Reports of Changes in the Prison Camps

David Hawk
Aug 27, 2013

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David Hawk interprets reports of changes in North Korea's political prison camps in his most recent report, North Korea's Hidden Gulag: Interpreting Reports of Changes in the Prison Camps. Please view the press release here

UPDATED: The North Korea Police State: Second Edition

UPDATED: The North Korea Police State: Second Edition

Ken Gause
May 29, 2013

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The newest version of Coercion, Control, Surveillance, and Punishment: An Examination of the North Korea Police State by Ken Gause, updated on May 24, 2013. 

North Korea's Camp No. 25

North Korea's Camp No. 25

HRNK & DigitalGlobe, Inc.
Feb 25, 2013

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For this report, DigitalGlobe Analytics examined eleven images collected from 2003 to 2013 of the North Korean political prison facility known as Camp 25 (a.k.a. Kwan-liso No. 25, Political Prison Facility No. 25, No. 25 Chongjin Political Concentration Camp, Susŏng Correctional Center) in Susŏng-dong, Ch’ŏngjin-si, Hamgyŏng-bukto, on the northeast coast of the nation. In this analysis, imagery was compared to identify changes in the organization of the camp, including variations in:

  • Walls, perimeter, guard posts and gates
  • Administrative areas
  • Light industrial and prisoner housing areas
  • Agriculture
  • Agricultural support facilities
  • Other buildings

Imagery of these areas could reveal changes that would provide insight into the operational status, prison population and security of Camp 25.

North Korea's Camp No. 22 - Update

North Korea's Camp No. 22 - Update

HRNK & DigitalGlobe, Inc.
Dec 11, 2012

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As a follow-up to the October 2012 joint HRNK- DigitalGlobe imagery analysis of North Korea’s Camp 22 (Kwan-li-so No. 22, Korean People’s Security Guard Unit 2209), DigitalGlobe’s Analysis Center was asked to assist in identifying reported activity in and around Camp 22 in Hamgyŏng-bukto. More specifically, the Analysis Center was to examine:

  • The outer perimeter fence, guard towers and guard positions to determine if some, or all, have been razed. The razing of these structures could indicate that Camp 22 prisoners have been replaced with a non-prisoner workforce.2
  • Mining-related activities in the Kungsim-dong and Kungsimjukp’o-dong areas. Undisclosed sources claim that mining operations in these areas have been shut down and the miners relocated to the Chungbong-dong (i.e., Camp 22) Mine, replacing the former prisoner workforce there.3
  • Examine and assess Camp 16 (Kwan-li-so No. 16) to determine if there is evidence that the prison population has increased in the past year. Such indications could support reports that prisoners from Camp 22 were transferred to Camp 16.
  • Because of time and resource constraints, the Analysis Center can only address the first two items at this time. A future report will examine Camp 16. 

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North Korea Camp No. 25 Update 2
Joseph S. Bermudez Jr., Andy Dinville, and Mike Eley
Nov 29, 2016

p.p1 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 9.0px Helvetica; color: #3f5864} span.s1 {font: 5.0px Helvetica} As part of a joint undertaking with HRNK to use satellite imagery to shed light on human suffering in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK, more commonly known as North Korea), AllSource Analysis has been monitoring activity at political prison facilities throughout North Korea. This report details activity observed during the past

North Korea: Flooding at Kyo-hwa-so No. 12, Jongo-ri
Greg Scarlatoiu and Joseph S. Bermudez Jr.
Sep 16, 2016

The Committee for Human Rights in North Korea (HRNK), a non-governmental organization based in Washington, DC and AllSource Analysis, a leading global provider of high-resolution earth imagery solutions, have conducted a satellite imagery-based rapid assessment of flood damage at Kyo-hwa-so No. 12, Jongo-ri in Hamgyŏng-bukto, North Korea. Thousands of political prisoners are held in this re-education prison labor camp together with common offenders.

North Korea: Kyo-hwa-so No. 12, Jongo-ri
Joseph S. Bermudez Jr. and Mike Eley
Aug 30, 2016

The Committee for Human Rights in North Korea (HRNK), a non-governmental organization based in Washington, D.C. and AllSource Analysis, a leading global provider of high-resolution earth imagery solutions, have launched a report entitled North Korea: Imagery Analysis of Kyo-hwa-so No. 12, Jongo-ri. Although the detention facility was featured in the September 2015 report The Hidden Gulag IV: Gender Repression and Prisoner Disappearances by David Hawk, this is the first HRNK/AllSource An

Gulag, Inc.: The Use of Forced Labor in North Korea's Export Industries
Kim Kwang-jin, HRNK Non-Resident Fellow
May 26, 2016

EMBARGOED UNTIL 12:01 AM EST THURSDAY, MAY 26, 2016 Coal, iron ore, copper, and other commodities constituting the bulk of North Korea’s exports are mined using forced and slave labor, according to a new 50-page report by the Committee for Human Rights in North Korea (HRNK). Authored by Kim Kwang-jin, North Korean escapee and senior analyst currently residing in South Korea, Gulag, Inc.: The Use of Forced Labor in North Korea’s Export Industries is an exami